It’s light if you use a forklift

12 January 2018
234 Views
Comments are off for this post

 

I was in a meeting this week with a client, and they were talking about the gigantic case they take to trade shows – which is called “The Coffin” and may have cost an employee a finger (the story wasn’t clear and I didn’t want to ask).  The person who bought it, and still saw it’s utility, countered the jokes and jabs by saying, “Well, actually, it’s light if you have a forklift.”  I’m not sure if it was a joke or a legitimate argument, but it got me thinking…

There are a number of pitfalls that will trip up people who don’t have a lot of experience with strategic planning.  One of the more regular ones – especially in retreats where people are asked to free their thinking – is not taking into account limited resources.

All kinds of amazing things are possible to dream up if you assume you have unlimited time, effort, strength, brainpower, flexibility, etc.

That case is light (if a forklift is available where we’re going, and we have the money to pay for it)

That metal is flexible (if we have a sledgehammer and the strength to wield it)

That market is accessible (if we have the VP of Sales who knows the right people and can use their trust to benefit our product)

That new initiative is going to be easy for people to support (if we have a culture that is very adaptive and a leader who consistently pushes it)

Options that look good with unlimited resources often look terrible when limitations come into play.  So it’s important to take resources – money, bandwidth, expertise, relationships – into account when choosing a strategy.

Overlooking resource constraints is just one form of a broader category that undermines strategy – the hidden assumption.

There’s no way to avoid hidden assumptions – we all have them lurking in our blindspots.  But there are things you can do in your planning to reduce the likelihood that assumptions will lead you into a bad decision:

  • Include people with different perspectives in your discussions – and listen to them all
  • Ask, “Why is this a stupid idea?” or “Why would this fail?”
  • Think of other decisions that ended badly and were driven by hidden assumptions, and assess if there are similarities
  • Clarify the criteria that you use to evaluate your options

One of the things that separates good strategists from poor ones is the ability to see what’s missing and hidden.  It’s a hard skill to develop – it takes knowledge and experience and inquisitiveness and discipline.

But it’s a really valuable skill.  If you reflect on the worst decisions you’ve made, they are usually built on top of a hidden assumption that turned out to be way more off base, and way more important, than you’d have imagined…if you’d known to think about it.