Important hire? Here’s the strategy…

1 February 2016
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You don’t need to hire every position with the same approach. Sure, some companies have the same hiring process for everyone, and it often involves spending 6 months on each hire and only hiring A+ people. In theory, that’s what you should do, but in practice, there are some hires that deserve more effort and some that deserve less.

How do you tell when to invest more or less? I’ll be talking about that on my webinar this month – the 3 different approaches to hiring, and when each one is appropriate.

For this column, I want to focus in on the highest-investment approach.

When does a hire deserve a heavy investment? The primary drivers are (a) the impact the position can have on the organization, and (b) the experience your company has with hiring that specific type of position. In other words, you should invest more heavily in your recruiting process when you’re hiring:

  • Executive or key manager positions – because the impact of that position will be a multiple of the costs of even an elaborate hiring process
  • New positions – because you don’t know what you’re looking for, and because you need to train your organization on what the new position will do

What does it mean to invest heavily in a hiring process? You should spend more time…

  • Planning the position before even starting the recruiting process
  • Choreographing the hiring process – who to include when
  • Building a bigger candidate pool
  • Interviewing candidates
  • Confirming your final choice

It’s OK not to go all-out on every hire. What’s important for growing companies is having the wisdom to know when a more extensive recruiting process is needed, and having the discipline to invest the time needed when it is required.

If you do that, you’ll avoid the costs of a bad hire, which can be dramatic – around 2-3x the person’s compensation for a manager, and 5-10x the person’s compensation for an executive.