• The challenges of marketing’s ROI

    30 October 2018
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    In my work as a fractional CMO, I am often helping small businesses navigate the transition from sales-driven revenue to marketing-driven revenue.  This is no small feat, because of the time and investment it takes.

    I just had lunch with the managing partner of a $5MM services firm.  He was telling me how hard it was to ask his partners to spend money on marketing – and he was talking about $20K, which was a fraction of what they would need to really become a marketing-driven company.  Why were his partners dubious?  Because the ROI was not going to be fast or definite enough.

    Compare that with a strategy meeting I was in last week for a $10MM services firm in which a partner – who was one of the biggest skeptics of marketing 2 years ago – said, “If we hadn’t invested in marketing over the last 2 years, I’m not sure we’d still be here today.”  (To his credit, he was a skeptic, but an open-minded one.)

    Let me tell you something that marketing agencies have a hard time telling you:  the ROI of marketing almost assuredly looks terrible for the first 12 months you’re doing it.  And may look terrible the second 12 months.

    But if you’ve made the right investments in that time, you almost assuredly will be reaping the rewards of your marketing machine by your third year.  And they are rewards that are beyond the scope of anything you could have generated with a sales-driven strategy.  In other words, marketing can get your business to the next level – but it’s going to cost you.

    It’s not easy for leaders to invest in something that is unproven and takes 12-24 months to start paying off – especially given the “black art” nature of marketing, which means that you can never really “arrive” at a marketing strategy that you can lock in and forget about.  Each company’s marketing recipe is different.  There are generalizations you can start from, but at least 1/3 of those generalizations will be wrong.

    Why “waste” all that money marketing, then?  Because building a marketing machine is like driving a car instead of pedaling a bike.  If you’re happy biking and it takes you where you want to go…great.  Stick with your sales-driven approach, and don’t bother building a marketing machine.  But if your market is getting more competitive, or your customers are more price sensitive, or your buying cycle is getting longer…that bike probably isn’t going to be enough anymore.

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  • Prioritizing priorities – making your strategy better

    24 September 2018
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    What do I mean by prioritizing your priorities?  Why is it important?  Why is it hard?

    It’s fairly easy for any business to come up with a dozen ideas for improvement – and most businesses wouldn’t stop there, generating dozens of possibilities.  The challenge for any leadership team is to pick the right priorities to focus extra attention on among all those many options.

    It’s easy to say, “You should have 3 big rocks that you focus on.”  It’s muuuuch harder to say, “These are the 3 rocks that will give you the best outcome.”  Why is it harder?  Because there are many variables to consider in coming up with the answer.  I’ll highlight 2 as examples:

    1. What’s the balance between financial outcomes and intangible outcomes?  You could work your staff hard for two years, get your financial results up, and then sell your business for great personal gain.  But many small companies have more connection to their employees, and so are willing to support work-life balance at the expense of financial performance.  In that case, you can’t just decide on priorities based on financial ROI.
    2. What if short-term success and long-term gain are not aligned?  Often they aren’t!  Short-term, it almost never makes sense to upgrade your systems.  But if you never upgrade systems, that will eventually undermine your results.  How do you balance those competing interests?  How do you decide whether long-term payoff is the right thing to aim for now?

    So this is a hard task.  Why not just avoid it?

    Because focus is a key part of success.  Spread yourself too thin, and you won’t have the energy to see your initiatives through to success.  As we all know, juggling 6 balls is far harder than juggling 3 balls.

    Although there are tools that can help you prioritize your priorities, this is not something that is driven by tools.  A SWOT or Gap analysis will not solve this problem.  A 1-page sheet that puts long-term vision, annual goals, and quarterly objectives…will not solve this problem.

    The center of this solution is wisdom and judgment.  It takes experience, insight, creativity, foresight, and thoughtfulness to prioritize your priorities.  Whereas operating a business is more akin to an industrial “assembly line” process, guiding a business is a craft that has as much art as science.  That’s why venture capital looks foremost at people when considering an investment.

    One of the great things about working with Stage 2 companies is that there is usually a strong team operating the business, and any gaps they have in operations can usually be filled with a toolkit from EOS or e-Myth or Rockefeller Rules.  Whether they are a strong team leading the business depends a lot on their ability to prioritize their priorities and pick the right things to choose on.

    I’ll be posting a self-assessment soon for you to gauge how your team is at leading your business.  So…well…this is just the placeholder until I get that!  But if you’re reading this and are interested, send me an email –  or give me a call and I’ll share what I have in draft form.

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