• How Job Descriptions Need to Change for Growing Small Businesses

    14 May 2012
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    Congratulations, Second Stage CEO.  You’ve gotten customers, survived cash flow crises, created a vibrant team.  And, now, at last, created job descriptions!  You put it off as long as you could, because job descriptions are so un-startup.  But you’ve realized that it’s time to get clear on what people are responsible for, so that there’s more accountability, and so that it’s clear whether that new hire is getting the job done (or not).

    If you’re a young Stage 2 company – say, 10-30 people – your job descriptions can focus on people’s responsibilities – what they do…their functional tasks.

    But if you’ve passed 30 people, you’re going to need more from your job descriptions – rather than responsibilities, you’re going to need to focus on competencies.

    What are competencies?  They are the things that people are able to do – which could mean making copies or putting a design into AutoCAD, or could also mean handling angry customers or juggling multiple priorities.  Sometimes competencies are the functional tasks, but frequently competencies are behaviors that go beyond the task.  Competencies give a much deeper view into what a person, position, or team is capable of.

    Responsibility:  process assessments

    Competency:  recognize errors and problem-solve when one is found

    Responsibility:  respond to customer inquiries

    Competency:  empathize with customers in pressure-filled situations

    You need to know the functional responsibilities of your people.  And if you look at the competencies you need in a position, you’ll paint a much richer picture of who can be successful, and what training your people might need.

    I’ll be talking more about this on my Stage 2 Secrets call this month – click here to register.

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  • When a Small Business Outgrows its Team – Talent Management Lessons

    7 May 2012
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    I work with a relatively small Stage 2 company that recently changed over 40% of its staff – and is far better because they did.

    When I started with them, they had several employees who had been great during the start-up.  They handled the relatively focused and simple work that needed to get done, and they were flexible.

    But then the company started to leave the start-up stage – client work came more regularly, there was less experimentation…and there was more work!  The work got harder and more complicated, and it needed to be done on schedule.

    After almost a year of struggling as a company, the leaders realized that many of their struggles were tied to not getting the productivity out of the team that they needed.  The employees were still good people and good workers – but the company had different needs, and these people were no longer a fit.  And, because these employees weren’t in jobs that fit for them, they were starting to create a negative culture.

    This wasn’t an easy decision.  Some of the workers were friends.  Some had helped build the company.  And, truthfully, the decision took probably twice as long as it needed to because of the loyalty the leaders felt to these staff.

    But when it became clear that the business needed new team members, the leaders made the decision, and gave the old staff generous severances.

    Then they found the right people for the environment, taking their time and thinking about what they needed.
    The results are dramatic.  The team is happy.  The finances are strong.  The work is interesting and fun.  It really is a different company – because it’s a different team.

    In Stage 2, the team is what is most important, not the quality of the work.  I know it’s not easy to make personnel decisions, but there are huge dividends for Second Stage companies that take an active approach to Talent Management.

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  • Mad Men’s Talent Management Lessons for Small Business

    30 April 2012
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    As usual, the TV show Mad Men is a hot-bed of intrigue again this season – and it’s especially fun to watch the workplace as a management consultant.  There are a few lessons that Mad Men can teach Second Stage leaders about Talent Management.

    The focus needs to be on people, not work. As Second Stage companies grow, they need to spend less time focusing on how the work gets done, and more time focusing on who is on the team and how they work together.  The firm’s partners are still focused on their work, not on managing their team, and I expect that we’ll start to see the team dysfunction increase as the season goes on.  (If it does, it would be natural for the firm to break apart at some point – team dynamics usually overtake good work.)

    Culture needs to be managed.  Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce, like every company, has a culture – the question is whether it’s consciously acknowledged and managed.  And the key to culture is defining just a few principles that drive the culture.  In this year’s premier, Megan calls out one of SCDP’s principles:  cynicism.  There’s no inherently good or bad principles – they just have to work for the company.  My guess is that the other principles for SDCP would be creativity, individualism, and fun.  It’s hard to have principles that don’t fit the executive team.

    Manage your high potentials.  Pete Campbell is a huge asset to the firm, but because there’s no one helping him manage his development and career path, he’s a problem.  High potentials are great – in many ways the heart of Stage 2 companies.  But they come with a cost – you need to make explicit, valuable investments in them.

    I suspect SDCP could use a better strategic planning process, too, but that’s a topic for another post…

    I’ll be talking more about this on my Stage 2 Secrets call this month – click here to register.

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  • A Shortcut for Your Compensation Planning?

    21 February 2012
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    I’m working with a $2MM firm right now to build in a performance-based aspect to their compensation program.

    Usually, I would follow a process of compensation strategy (guiding principles for how we make comp decisions) > compensation framework (the components that go into comp decisions) > performance framework (the specific definitions of performance).  (If you want a full description of the process, you can get it from my book, The Stage 2 Owner’s Manual.)

    But with a small firm, we’ll be able to skip the comp framework step.  That’s the step where “What does it take for you to stay in the game?” changes to “What is the right amount to pay you?”  It looks at things like market pay rates, and what the role of the person is.

    If you’re a small Second Stage Company, the most important things to address when you upgrade your compensation program is why you pay people what you do – the overarching principles that are at play, and the specific performance drivers you look at.  When you get bigger, or when compensation starts causing you problems, you can fine-tune your pay program based on some more sophisticated thinking about what makes up employee compensation.  But that’s a short-cut that, in most cases, is fine to take when you’re smaller.

    I’ll be talking more about compensation on my Stage 2 Secrets call this month – click here to register.

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  • Why Getting Compensation Right is Important to Your Growing Business

    10 February 2012
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    Stage 2 management focuses on getting approximate answers, not precise ones – and then using judgment to realize when an answer can be more approximate, and when it needs to be more precise.

    Have you ever thought about the impact of over-paying, or under-paying, the staff in your Second Stage company?

    If you are over-paying, then you are taking resources away from other parts of the business that would give you a higher ROI.  Over time, you’ll under-invest in the areas of the business that make your company stronger, and the result is a company that is paying its employees relatively well while weakening the business.

    If you are under-paying, the opposite is true.  You are “mining” your employees for the value they create, and if they don’t feel rewarded, you will be faced with a triple-whammy – you’ll lose someone who was providing more value to the company than you realized, you’ll have turn-over costs, and you’ll have to spend more than you expected to replace that person.

    Compensation is about aligning the rewards that employees get with the value that they create for the business.  As your business gets more complex in Stage 2, that alignment gets harder, and more important.

    You’ll never pay someone exactly the right amount, but making sure you’re close is important for you, your business, and your employees.

    I’ll be talking more about compensation on my Stage 2 Secrets call this month – click here to register.

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  • Top Compensation Mistakes Second Stage Companies Make

    8 February 2012
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    I was reading the blog post Top Compensation Planning Mistakes (And How to Avoid Them) and there were a couple that stood out as particularly important for Second Stage Companies:

    Saying one thing and doing another, which the blog says can be avoided by “avoiding secrets…and reducing exceptions.” The particular challenge for Stage 2 is that most leaders who are emerging out of the start-up phase don’t have expertise in compensation, and don’t realize how complicated it gets in Stage 2, and so they hide how they make compensation decisions in a “black box.” This usually works fine for some period and then starts to break down as they add people. In Stage 2, it’s especially important to think through a comp strategy so that you can avoid secrets and reduce exceptions.

    Not preparing managers to talk about compensation, which the blog says can be avoided through training and scripting answers to key questions like “How does the organization set salaries?” and “Why did I only get this much money?” The particular challenge is that most Stage 2 managers don’t have expertise or experience dealing with compensation – and in fact what experience they have is with the start-up phase’s “What do you need to stay in the game?” approach. One of the most important aspects of a compensation program for a Stage 2 company is the messages that it communicates about how the company creates value and how performance is measured. If those messages don’t make it to employees – or, worse, if the wrong messages are communicated – much of the power of the compensation program is lost.

    I’ll be talking more about compensation on my Stage 2 Secrets call this month – click here to register.

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