• Prioritizing priorities – making your strategy better

    24 September 2018
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    What do I mean by prioritizing your priorities?  Why is it important?  Why is it hard?

    It’s fairly easy for any business to come up with a dozen ideas for improvement – and most businesses wouldn’t stop there, generating dozens of possibilities.  The challenge for any leadership team is to pick the right priorities to focus extra attention on among all those many options.

    It’s easy to say, “You should have 3 big rocks that you focus on.”  It’s muuuuch harder to say, “These are the 3 rocks that will give you the best outcome.”  Why is it harder?  Because there are many variables to consider in coming up with the answer.  I’ll highlight 2 as examples:

    1. What’s the balance between financial outcomes and intangible outcomes?  You could work your staff hard for two years, get your financial results up, and then sell your business for great personal gain.  But many small companies have more connection to their employees, and so are willing to support work-life balance at the expense of financial performance.  In that case, you can’t just decide on priorities based on financial ROI.
    2. What if short-term success and long-term gain are not aligned?  Often they aren’t!  Short-term, it almost never makes sense to upgrade your systems.  But if you never upgrade systems, that will eventually undermine your results.  How do you balance those competing interests?  How do you decide whether long-term payoff is the right thing to aim for now?

    So this is a hard task.  Why not just avoid it?

    Because focus is a key part of success.  Spread yourself too thin, and you won’t have the energy to see your initiatives through to success.  As we all know, juggling 6 balls is far harder than juggling 3 balls.

    Although there are tools that can help you prioritize your priorities, this is not something that is driven by tools.  A SWOT or Gap analysis will not solve this problem.  A 1-page sheet that puts long-term vision, annual goals, and quarterly objectives…will not solve this problem.

    The center of this solution is wisdom and judgment.  It takes experience, insight, creativity, foresight, and thoughtfulness to prioritize your priorities.  Whereas operating a business is more akin to an industrial “assembly line” process, guiding a business is a craft that has as much art as science.  That’s why venture capital looks foremost at people when considering an investment.

    One of the great things about working with Stage 2 companies is that there is usually a strong team operating the business, and any gaps they have in operations can usually be filled with a toolkit from EOS or e-Myth or Rockefeller Rules.  Whether they are a strong team leading the business depends a lot on their ability to prioritize their priorities and pick the right things to choose on.

    I’ll be posting a self-assessment soon for you to gauge how your team is at leading your business.  So…well…this is just the placeholder until I get that!  But if you’re reading this and are interested, send me an email –  or give me a call and I’ll share what I have in draft form.

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  • Your business model is a depreciating asset

    9 March 2018
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    Most people recognize that markets don’t stand still.  Customers, competitors, and technology are constantly changing.

    Although most people recognize that, many don’t appreciate the imperative that that dynamic places on them as leaders.  The simplest way I’ve learned to describe that imperative is this…

    Your business model is a depreciating asset.

    In other words, the way you do business – whether that’s how you find customers, how you produce what you offer, how you deliver what you sell – is losing value every day.

    Like other depreciating assets you have – your house, car, refrigerator, computer – you have to maintain it simply for it to keep working the way it’s supposed to.  And you have to more-fundamentally change or replace it on some kind of predictable cycle – 3-4 years for a computer, 5-10 for a refrigerator.

    How quickly your business model depreciates is mostly a function of the degree of change in your market.  And, since there’s more change in every market these days, we all need to put our leadership teams on notice that we’re going to have to reinvent our business model sooner than we’re used to.  Rule of thumb:  the cycle is probably half what it used to be.  (So if the model used to last 10 years, it’s best to plan for it to last 5.)

    If your leadership team is skeptical when you tell them this, offer the following true story.  I know a smart, tech-savvy teenager who has a nose for online businesses.  He found an opportunity last Fall that he liked.  Here’s how that played out:

    • Week 0 – discovered opportunity
    • Week 1 – supply chain set up
    • Week 2 – open for business
    • Week 5 – profits to date:  $200K
    • Week 11 – profits to date $500K
    • Week 13 – rejected offer to purchase business for $100K
    • Week 16 – competitors raise cost of advertising to a level that the economics no longer work, business model no longer profitable, business closed

    To summarize, that’s a business model that was able to net $500K in 4 months – I know $15MM businesses that aren’t generating that profit for the year – but whose value depreciated to $0 in that same 4 months.

    If you talk about markets changing, it seems like something “out there” that may not impact you.  If you talk about your business model depreciating around you week by week, it gets much clearer that you need to act with some urgency.

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  • Sales Enablement, A Love Story

    8 February 2018
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    It’s Valentine’s Day – a day when we celebrate the role that marketing and sales plays in our personal lives.  And in honor of Valentine’s Day, let’s take a look at a new trend in marketing and sales.

    Many of my clients love sales and hate marketing.  Sales is short-term, tangible, clear – what’s not to like about sales?!  On the other hand, marketing is long-term, more subtle and intangible, and much less clear.  Unfortunately, many business owners never get past that black/white dynamic to see that marketing is one of the most important pieces of the puzzle to grow a business.

    Good marketing – at the small/mid-sized business level – has always been about driving revenue – getting more people to buy more, sooner, at higher margins.  But that’s often overlooked when marketing focuses on tweets and clicks and likes and pretty graphics.

    Fortunately, there’s a new trend that focuses more on the good kind of marketing – that trend is Sales Enablement.

    Sales Enablement is how marketing helps sales – it’s the tools, systems, content, and support that salespeople use to engage prospects efficiently.  Because there is more competition today than there used to be, businesses cannot afford the inefficiency in the sales process that used to be OK.  Marketing brings scale, consistency, and clarity that brings down the costs of making the sale.

    At a recent marketing and sales retreat I led, we reviewed a Hubspot video on Sales Enablement.  It said that 70% of the buyer’s decision is made before they even talk to a salesperson.  In other words, most of “sales” actually happens during the phase that is usually handled by marketing.

    What does the trend toward Sales Enablement mean for you?

    • Most small businesses are overinvesting in salespeople and underinvesting in their marketing.
    • Sales needs to describe to marketing what it’s hearing from prospects and customers, and what it needs to address buyer concerns.
    • Marketing needs to create for sales standardized tools and strong, consistent messages to make the sales process more efficient.
    • You need to appreciate what a strong connection there is between educating prospects about their needs, and making sales.  Buyers are making their decisions while they’re learning…in fact, because of what they are learning.

    Sales Enablement can help you generate more revenue more efficiently.  If you think your sales and marketing are not keeping up with the times, you should use the topic of Sales Enablement to open a discussion among your leadership team about how your approach could change.

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  • 50 Shades of Grey, Small Business Edition

    How could I not take up the challenge of finding the link between the 50 Shades juggernaut and my beloved Stage 2 small business clients!?!

    Putting aside the more mundane topics of what Christian Grey’s DISC profile is, the importance of proper inventory processes, and the merits of NDAs, I’m struck by the similarity between Christian’s dominant role and how Shane Yount, owner of the Process-Based Leadership system, describes some companies:

    [Managing by position, proximity, or persuasion] creates dependency. Employees become dependent on their leaders to make the decisions, to solve the problems, to show them what to do and when to do it. Certainly managing by position, proximity and persuasion gets short-term results. But dependency is dysfunctional.

    It may seem extreme to draw a parallel between 50 Shades’ dominant/submissive relationship and how many small business leaders operate, but there’s probably more truth to it than many owners would like to admit.

    Recently I talked with a group of Stage 2 company CEOs, and one of their big a-ha moments was when they realized how dependent their organizations are on the leader’s opinion, intuition, and judgment.

    If you realize that your leadership is out of balance, or if your employees start to refer to you as Mr/Ms Grey…what can you do?

    The first step is creating a dialogue with your managers.  You want a process to be guiding the company, not a person, and to do that, you need to start a process that involves your leaders in key decisions – and then you need to stay committed to it.  And, if you’ve been doing a lot of the talking, start listening more.  Don’t totally hand over the reins, but start to share them.

    What should you talk about?  To start, I like to focus on today – what is working, what isn’t working?  Once you have things working OK, then you can start looking out farther on the horizon – to the next few months, and then to the next year, and then to the next 2-3 years.

    Let’s be honest about something Christian Grey knows – it’s fun and exciting to be in charge, to be The One Who Makes the Calls.  But it’s also not sustainable, and if you’re looking for your business to prosper for the long-run, you need to mature as a leader and expand how you relate to your business.

     

     

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  • My Goals Can Beat Up Your Goals

    Making Better Goals with a Strong Annual Planning Process

    Although it seems like just yesterday that the days were hot and we were at the local swimming hole, this is the time to start thinking about annual planning.  Some of my clients have small, simple businesses and handle their planning in an afternoon.  Others are larger and more complex, and we spend 4 days over the course of 3 months.

    No matter the extent of the process, they all have the same underlying process:

    –          Assess the environment and identify areas that have potential to improve the performance of the business

    –          Select the areas that have the best potential impact, and create initiatives to address those areas

    –          Define and justify the investments needed for the initiatives

    –          Develop action plans

    –          Launch the initiatives with managers and staff

    There’s a rich set of best practices and tools for each of those steps.  For example, many people like to use the SWOT framework to assess their situation.  But I’ve found that reviewing hits and misses often provides better insight into areas of improvement.

    On my Monthly Strategy Slice webinar, we’ll be looking at a small slice of the annual planning process – how to make sure you have a strong set of initiatives to focus on.  On the webinar, we’ll talk about tools to evaluate your initiatives along 4 dimensions:

    –          Are you focusing externally (e.g., developing new markets), internally (e.g., reorganizing), or a combination of both?

    –          Are you focusing on initiatives with short-term payoff (e.g., a marketing campaign to existing customers), medium-term payoff (e.g., hiring an important new position), or long-term payoff (e.g., launching a new product)?

    –          Do you have a mix of initiatives that will have a big (transformative) payoff and smaller (incremental) payoffs?

    –          Do you have a mix of initiatives that have different investment profiles – some requiring relatively little investment, and others needing heavy investment?

    We’ll talk about how to evaluate annual priorities, and how to apply the evaluation tools to your business on my webinar – please join us if you want to see these in action.

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  • The Sales Process Mash-Up Your Small Business Needs

    iStock_000050415148_Medium

    I’m going to be talking about sales process on my webinar this month, and I want to focus in on the most interesting part of the sales process for this article – creating a “mash-up” of assertiveness and empathy to engage a prospect about the needs they have.

    But before I do that, I first have to talk about an important part of the sales process.  If you want to get paid the value you deserve for the expertise you have, you have to make sure that your discussions with prospects start with a collaborative dialogue about their needs.  If they’ve already defined their needs, and they’re just talking to you about a solution, then you will not get the value you deserve.

    The problem is, though, that most prospects think that they’ve already defined their need.

    So, how do your salespeople provoke prospects enough to change their thinking – to throw them off the path they’re already on for a solution, and get them to think more about their needs?  To do that, your salespeople need to be assertive – they need to prove that they know as much about the prospect’s situation as the prospect does, and it will pay off for the prospect to listen to the salesperson.  But your salespeople need to do that carefully – if they’re too assertive, then they’ll probably be dismissed.  So they also need to be empathetic.

    And that’s the hardest challenge your salespeople have today – how do you be assertive enough to get people to talk with you, and empathetic enough that they want to talk with you?  That’s the sales process mash-up that every growth business needs to figure out.

    We find the answer to this challenge in the playbook of a Trusted Advisor.  Trusted Advisors have independent perspective that the person values (that’s the Advisor part) and the connection and understanding that reassures the person (that’s the Trusted part).

    I’ve worked with several clients recently to create “Trusted Advisor Tools” for their people to use in sales discussions to build trust and provoke prospects to question how they’re thinking.  I think every business needs these tools.

    The salespeople usually see immediately how valuable these tools are and are enthusiastic to start using them.  And many are actually relieved because they haven’t known how to push back against prospects in a supportive way.

    We’ll develop some sample Trusted Advisor Tools on my webinar – please join us if you want to see these in action.

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  • Developing Your High-Potentials – The No-Brainer You’re Missing

    If there’s one thing in Stage 2 companies that does not take a lot of thinking, it’s identifying who your “High Potential” staff are.  They come to mind immediately whenever I ask leaders who they are.

    But, as much as it’s a no-brainer to get the most out of the people who offer the most, Stage 2 companies do a consistently horrible job of actively developing their High Potentials.  Why?  Because the Well-Oiled-and-Balanced Wheel is easy to ignore (and besides, it has a lot of weight to carry and can’t afford much “down time”.)

    The first step I’d recommend in developing your High Potentials is to come up with a model that you can use to identify your High Potentials.  Since it’s always obvious who they are, why would you need a model?  Two reasons.

    First, you need a program to develop your High Potentials, both to get the benefit of the full value that they can give you, and to keep them engaged and hopeful about their future at your company.  And in order to have a program, you need to explain to people who is part of the program and who is not.

    Second, you also have people who are Good Potentials.  Most of them will never make the jump to High Potential – but some of them will.  And to do that, they need a model of what they’re aiming for – what a High Potential is.

    I have a 1-page model for talking about High Potentials.  It’s a graphic that you can put in front of High Potentials to talk about why you value them so much and how you want to continue to develop them.  And you can show it to Everyone Else to explain in simple terms what it takes to be (and be treated like) a High Potential.

    If you want to see my model and learn some tips for using it, sign up for my upcoming August Strategy Hour webinar (even if you can’t make it you’ll get a copy), or go to the Contact Us page and reach out to me to request it.

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  • The Simple Formula of Value Propositions

    3x3

    Stage 2 companies must already have a clear and compelling value proposition if they’re successful enough to have grown out of start-up, right?

    Well, yes and no.  They do have enough traction in the marketplace to show that they have a value proposition that works.  But it’s actually unlikely that the company has a systematic way to communicate the value proposition.  And if that is the case, it will find that revenue growth is harder and harder to achieve – and in a competitive market, the company may start to lose ground to other companies who are communicating their message better.

    What should a value proposition look like?  When I started out in marketing, I worked with an excellent marketing agency, who explained that the “brand positioning statement” should follow a classic formula of, “For [market segment], Our Brand is the [product category] that [customer benefits] by [points of differentiation].”

    So, for a clear and compelling value proposition, you need:

    –          A clearly defined target market segment or customer profile – is it marketing directors who work with global brands, or owners small businesses in cities, or…

    –          A definition of the product category – the marketing agency I worked with explained that orange juice could be defined as a breakfast drink or as a health drink, so picking the product category has a big impact on how the product itself is perceived

    –          A description of the customer benefits – what are the pains you alleviate (lost revenue, production downtime, etc.) and gains you enable (new revenue sources, talent retention, etc.)

    –          The points of differentiation – choosing from all the ways that your product works or the ways you deliver your service, what are the ways that set it apart from the competition?

    Once you have your value proposition, make sure you reinforce it with everyone in your company, and you use it to focus your marketing and sales messages.

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  • Designing Powerful Dashboards

    Sometimes I’m asked to help companies find the right path for their next 3-5 years – which qualifies as “long-term” strategy for a Stage 2 company.  Other times, my strategy work focuses on short-term performance.  In either case, it’s useful to have some way to measure progress and check to make sure we’re on the right track – to have a dashboard or scoreboard.

    In designing a dashboard, there are 2 main factors:  (1) what you will measure, and (2) how you will measure it.  I would rather have a precise description of the business driver and an imprecise metric than an imprecise description of the business driver and a precise metric.  In other words, it’s more important to understand what to measure than to have a top-quality measure itself – it’s not much help to have an accurate measure of something that doesn’t matter.  Or, said even another way, you should not pick your metrics by what is easy to measure – you should focus on what will drive your business, and then do the best you can to approximate a metric if there isn’t one easily available.

    As for the business drivers, when you’re measuring short-term performance, the first job is to decide what’s important to track – what’s going to move the needle.  In general, the items to track to improve short-term performance are going to be either revenue or costs/productivity.  However, I recommend you come up with more specific metrics that zero in on exactly how you’re going to drive those areas.  Examples would be:

    •          Revenues from our top 20 customers
    •          Revenues from new customers
    •          Revenues from a particular product line or market sector
    •          Costs or productivity of non-customer-related activities
    •          Costs or productivity in the areas of your largest expense areas

    For a situation where the short-term performance is OK and the focus needs to be on medium- and long-term initiatives, there are a broader range of areas that are usually represented in a dashboard.  Examples of long-term programs include:

    •           Development of new products
    •           Diversification into new markets
    •           Building a new way to acquire customers
    •           Changing the sales process
    •           Training and developing your people in general, or the skills in a particular part of the business
    •           Developing partnerships

    So, what do you do if you don’t have a precise metric available?  I’ve found that Green/Yellow/Red works fine as long as (a) there is a clear owner of the area that is being tracked, and (b) there is discussion about the status.  The benefit of having an actual metric is that good data leaves little open to interpretation.  (“Data ends discussions.”)  If you’re not working with good data, but instead using something like a color scheme, then you’ll have to make sure you spend time understanding and interpreting what’s going on.

    I’ll have some more specific recommendations for designing dashboards during my upcoming Monthly Strategy Hour – register to hear more and ask any questions you have.

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  • Bigger, better decisions

    Man playing chess

    Not all strategic decisions need the same amount of analysis.  This is something that many founders understand intuitively.  But it’s also something that becomes more complicated as a company grows.

    Why?  Because the decisions get bigger and more complicated, what worked for a Big Decision in the past often doesn’t work for the Big Decisions of a bigger company.  In addition, the “decision environment” gets more complicated, with more potential participants and more dynamics among them.  Who do you include?  When?  How?  Who provides input and who participates in the decision?  How is the decision actually made?

    What qualifies as a Big Decision?  Something where the payoffs are extraordinary – say, it could have an impact of 20% or more of a company’s revenue, or it could impact more than a third of the employees – and/or where the risks are extraordinary – say, it could take 20% or more of a company’s discretionary resources to implement.

    Decisions fall on a continuum – as the stakes rise, so does the need to treat the decision more seriously.

    And how do you do that?  As the decision gets bigger, you should add more information, more structure and process, and more focus and energy on the decision before its made.  If you don’t, you can be pretty sure you’ll be spending more time than you’d like or expect after the decision.

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