• The High-Potential Talent Stack

    13 April 2018
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    I recently gave a webinar for the SPARK.grow program on high-potential employees – how companies can identify, foster, and be attractive to high-potential employees, and how high-potentials can identify, develop, and be attractive to high-potential roles. (The recording of the webinar is here.)

    I described a “High-Potential Talent Stack.”  That stack has 6 levels – the bottom 3 are the factors that enable someone to perform at any job, and the top 3 levels are the factors that enable someone to perform as a leader.  I want to describe each level…

    Performance – this is how well the person gets work done

    Results Focus – this is the ability to not just put in the effort, but to figure out a way to go around roadblocks and keep at a task until you get the result that is needed

    Learning – high-potentials are always expanding their toolkit of skills, and learning about the work they do

    Investment Thinking – this is the ability to think in terms of Return on Investment

    Maturity – high-potentials handle themselves well, in different situations and with different people

    Leadership – this is the combination of skills that are needed to get a team to perform at a level and in a direction that they wouldn’t get to on their own

    This stack is a powerful tool.  It shows what a company can look for when hiring new staff, and what they can train and develop to improve their high-potentials – and shows high-potentials what skills to develop for further growth.

    Each level of the stack has 3 more specific components.  The target is to score a total of 12 or higher when each of those components is rated on a 1-5 scale.  Scores of 4-4-4, 5-4-3, or 5-5-2 would all qualify; scores of 5-3-3, 4-4-3, 5-5-1 would not qualify.  It’s a high hurdle – but the people that meet that standard are often the “10x-ers” – the ones who have 10x the impact on your business than your typical employee.

    Almost universally, small businesses underinvest in their high potentials.  There’s too much potential ROI for you to do that.

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  • Your business model is a depreciating asset

    9 March 2018
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    Most people recognize that markets don’t stand still.  Customers, competitors, and technology are constantly changing.

    Although most people recognize that, many don’t appreciate the imperative that that dynamic places on them as leaders.  The simplest way I’ve learned to describe that imperative is this…

    Your business model is a depreciating asset.

    In other words, the way you do business – whether that’s how you find customers, how you produce what you offer, how you deliver what you sell – is losing value every day.

    Like other depreciating assets you have – your house, car, refrigerator, computer – you have to maintain it simply for it to keep working the way it’s supposed to.  And you have to more-fundamentally change or replace it on some kind of predictable cycle – 3-4 years for a computer, 5-10 for a refrigerator.

    How quickly your business model depreciates is mostly a function of the degree of change in your market.  And, since there’s more change in every market these days, we all need to put our leadership teams on notice that we’re going to have to reinvent our business model sooner than we’re used to.  Rule of thumb:  the cycle is probably half what it used to be.  (So if the model used to last 10 years, it’s best to plan for it to last 5.)

    If your leadership team is skeptical when you tell them this, offer the following true story.  I know a smart, tech-savvy teenager who has a nose for online businesses.  He found an opportunity last Fall that he liked.  Here’s how that played out:

    • Week 0 – discovered opportunity
    • Week 1 – supply chain set up
    • Week 2 – open for business
    • Week 5 – profits to date:  $200K
    • Week 11 – profits to date $500K
    • Week 13 – rejected offer to purchase business for $100K
    • Week 16 – competitors raise cost of advertising to a level that the economics no longer work, business model no longer profitable, business closed

    To summarize, that’s a business model that was able to net $500K in 4 months – I know $15MM businesses that aren’t generating that profit for the year – but whose value depreciated to $0 in that same 4 months.

    If you talk about markets changing, it seems like something “out there” that may not impact you.  If you talk about your business model depreciating around you week by week, it gets much clearer that you need to act with some urgency.

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  • It’s light if you use a forklift

    12 January 2018
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    I was in a meeting this week with a client, and they were talking about the gigantic case they take to trade shows – which is called “The Coffin” and may have cost an employee a finger (the story wasn’t clear and I didn’t want to ask).  The person who bought it, and still saw it’s utility, countered the jokes and jabs by saying, “Well, actually, it’s light if you have a forklift.”  I’m not sure if it was a joke or a legitimate argument, but it got me thinking…

    There are a number of pitfalls that will trip up people who don’t have a lot of experience with strategic planning.  One of the more regular ones – especially in retreats where people are asked to free their thinking – is not taking into account limited resources.

    All kinds of amazing things are possible to dream up if you assume you have unlimited time, effort, strength, brainpower, flexibility, etc.

    That case is light (if a forklift is available where we’re going, and we have the money to pay for it)

    That metal is flexible (if we have a sledgehammer and the strength to wield it)

    That market is accessible (if we have the VP of Sales who knows the right people and can use their trust to benefit our product)

    That new initiative is going to be easy for people to support (if we have a culture that is very adaptive and a leader who consistently pushes it)

    Options that look good with unlimited resources often look terrible when limitations come into play.  So it’s important to take resources – money, bandwidth, expertise, relationships – into account when choosing a strategy.

    Overlooking resource constraints is just one form of a broader category that undermines strategy – the hidden assumption.

    There’s no way to avoid hidden assumptions – we all have them lurking in our blindspots.  But there are things you can do in your planning to reduce the likelihood that assumptions will lead you into a bad decision:

    • Include people with different perspectives in your discussions – and listen to them all
    • Ask, “Why is this a stupid idea?” or “Why would this fail?”
    • Think of other decisions that ended badly and were driven by hidden assumptions, and assess if there are similarities
    • Clarify the criteria that you use to evaluate your options

    One of the things that separates good strategists from poor ones is the ability to see what’s missing and hidden.  It’s a hard skill to develop – it takes knowledge and experience and inquisitiveness and discipline.

    But it’s a really valuable skill.  If you reflect on the worst decisions you’ve made, they are usually built on top of a hidden assumption that turned out to be way more off base, and way more important, than you’d have imagined…if you’d known to think about it.

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  • The Bots are Coming! The Bots are Coming!

    5 December 2017
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    AI and machine learning have exploded onto the business scene in 2017.  If you haven’t gotten an email asking you if you want to learn how IBM’s Watson can help your business, you will be soon.  And we’re just getting started.

    The bots are coming, and if you’re thinking your business is immune, I don’t think you’ll feel the same way by 2020.

    What should you be doing in 2018 to prepare?

    Many small companies are not going to have the budget needed to use AI.  But if you’re in a small company, you should still learn about what it can do and how it can be used.  By hearing how AI is being used in your sector, you can make your offerings better and your operations more efficient – even if you don’t spend a dollar on AI technology itself.

    You should also figure out your company’s algorithms.  AI works through algorithms – coded logic about how to interpret data.  You may not have Big Data to work with, but you have algorithms operating in your company…like which customers are better to work with, what products help with what needs that a customer has, and ­which of your staff to assign to which types of projects.

    Back in the old days, this was called Experience, or Tribal Knowledge.  Now…we call it Algorithms.

    Your algorithms will probably start simple – like which customers are better to work with.  But that’s just the start.  The real power comes when you think about branches that you can build to make the thinking more complex.  For example, once you identify what services help with what needs, then you can identify if customers of one service are more likely to buy another service you offer.  Where are the connections and patterns in your business?

    Many of the small businesses I work with know these algorithms intuitively – they’re operating all the time in the heads of the staff who have been there more than 10 years.  Often the first reaction I get when I bring up the idea of capturing the company’s algorithms is, “Oh, we don’t need to do that.  We know that already…in our heads.”

    Which is great…but right now, someone is working on coding into a computer the algorithms that are needed to run your type of business.  It’s happening.  Right now.  Believe me.

    And the need to document your algorithms will be much clearer – and more urgent – when your staff person is competing with a machine that costs less than a month of that person’s salary and doesn’t need health care.  When that happens, you’re going to wish that you’d asked your staff to outline how they make the decisions that run your business.  And that staff person is going to wish that they’d been thinking about how to build value on top of their knowledge, rather than clinging to the knowledge itself as the differentiator.

    What do you do when knowledge and experience are no longer differentiators?  What will the differentiators be?  I have some guesses, that I’ll outline another time…

    So, I don’t know how all of this will play out.  I’m sure bots, at some point, will be able to do most of what we rely on workers to do now…and that there will be needs that bots can’t handle.  But while we’re waiting for that to play out, you can use the thinking of AI designers to make your business better and be in better control of your destiny.  And you can do that whether you can afford the actual AI technology or not.

    Pretend that you’re designing your own bots, give them fun/interesting names (Watson! Alexa! Siri!), and have some interesting discussions with your Leadership Team about the algorithms driving your business.

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  • ESPN and the need for generalists

    14 May 2017
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    As a small business coach, I’m always interested when the conversations I’m having in my client strategy meetings are echoed in news from the Fortune 500.  And we had one such example last week – ESPN’s transition of their on-air talent from specialists to generalists.

    Specifically, ESPN’s President John Skipper said, “Dynamic change demands an increased focus on versatility.”

    Many of my clients are professional services firms – they are selling their people’s skills and thinking.  Several weeks ago, in a quarterly strategy meeting with a 40-person services firm, the leaders asked me what I thought about a shift they were considering to organize themselves in specialized teams that could create deep expertise in certain areas.  Here’s what I said:

    •  There is a lot of uncertainty in the market.  That means that you don’t know what kind of work will come in, or when it will come in. (I am seeing this across my client base.)
    • As a result, you have to have flexibility in who you assign to different jobs, because your talent assignments are probably not going to work the way you plan them.
    • The only way you can have the flexibility you need to handle work in this uncertain environment is to actively develop cross-discipline agility – you have to make sure that people’s “downtime” is spent developing new skills.

    In other words, you need to have a talent base that has a lot of flexibility in what and how it works – which is exactly why ESPN is making the shift they are, to multi-dimensional on-air talent.

    Creating a flexible staff is no small task for small businesses.  The large majority of small businesses under-develop their talent – that is to say, their talent development is mostly opportunistic and accidental assignments that happen to build new skills.  That’s often OK – but it’s less likely to be OK these days, and companies who don’t get better at talent development are going to feel the pinch and pain of less-agile workers more and more, since the market will continue to be an uncertain place.

    What’s needed to actively develop your people?  How should they fill their downtime?  Have your people…

    • Explore new areas by looking through trade publications or surfing industry web sites
    • Hold regular lunch-and-learns for your staff to educate each other
    • Shadow each other doing work that’s new to them
    • Sit in on internal or customer meetings that involve new areas for them

    Are you developing the generalists your business needs – the ones with the skills and agility to navigate the uncertain environment we all face?

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  • To MOVE the needle, you’ve got to SEE the needle

    28 February 2016
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    Wellhead Pressure Gauge

    Crafting a dashboard that works

    I’m going to be talking about dashboards on the Rising Leader webinar in March, and as I prep for that session, I’m reminded of why you should create a dashboard in the first place.

    It may seem obvious on the surface, but a dashboard keeps visible and helps you track two things:

    • What in your business will “move the needle” for success
    • What you want to focus your attention on

    Companies with fewer than about 25 people often don’t need a dashboard (which doesn’t mean they wouldn’t benefit from one). At that size, the team instinctively knows what’s important, and the leaders are close to the action.

    Bigger than 25 people, though, and a dashboard is useful. Unfortunately, a dashboard is also harder at that size, for several reasons:

    • There are simply more parts of the business – more things that the company is doing, many of which seem important. What is really important to put on the dashboard?
    • There become several levels of “frames” that can be used to understand the business. There’s the tactical/trenches level (returning a customer’s email), the “strat-tactical” level (customer service), and the strategic level (the customer experience). Once you identify a part of your business that’s important, then you need to figure out if you measure it at the 100-, 1,000-, 10,000- level, or 50,000-foot level.
    • There often is no immediate, easy source of data for issues that are important. For example, most people would agree that employee engagement is important to most companies – but how do you measure that? [Note: there are some pretty simple ways.]

    So, crafting an effective dashboard takes thought.

    Many companies have an annual budgeting process – they recognize that coming up with financial plans is complex enough that they should spend time figuring it out.

    Well, you should also have an annual “dashboarding” process that figures out what’s important to your business and what you want to focus your attention on. Some things will always be important; others will come and go.

    If you’re a middle manager or a high-potential employee, you can join the Rising Leader Program and hear more about dashboards this month in our webinar. Visit phimation.com/start to find out more.

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  • Designing Powerful Dashboards

    Sometimes I’m asked to help companies find the right path for their next 3-5 years – which qualifies as “long-term” strategy for a Stage 2 company.  Other times, my strategy work focuses on short-term performance.  In either case, it’s useful to have some way to measure progress and check to make sure we’re on the right track – to have a dashboard or scoreboard.

    In designing a dashboard, there are 2 main factors:  (1) what you will measure, and (2) how you will measure it.  I would rather have a precise description of the business driver and an imprecise metric than an imprecise description of the business driver and a precise metric.  In other words, it’s more important to understand what to measure than to have a top-quality measure itself – it’s not much help to have an accurate measure of something that doesn’t matter.  Or, said even another way, you should not pick your metrics by what is easy to measure – you should focus on what will drive your business, and then do the best you can to approximate a metric if there isn’t one easily available.

    As for the business drivers, when you’re measuring short-term performance, the first job is to decide what’s important to track – what’s going to move the needle.  In general, the items to track to improve short-term performance are going to be either revenue or costs/productivity.  However, I recommend you come up with more specific metrics that zero in on exactly how you’re going to drive those areas.  Examples would be:

    •          Revenues from our top 20 customers
    •          Revenues from new customers
    •          Revenues from a particular product line or market sector
    •          Costs or productivity of non-customer-related activities
    •          Costs or productivity in the areas of your largest expense areas

    For a situation where the short-term performance is OK and the focus needs to be on medium- and long-term initiatives, there are a broader range of areas that are usually represented in a dashboard.  Examples of long-term programs include:

    •           Development of new products
    •           Diversification into new markets
    •           Building a new way to acquire customers
    •           Changing the sales process
    •           Training and developing your people in general, or the skills in a particular part of the business
    •           Developing partnerships

    So, what do you do if you don’t have a precise metric available?  I’ve found that Green/Yellow/Red works fine as long as (a) there is a clear owner of the area that is being tracked, and (b) there is discussion about the status.  The benefit of having an actual metric is that good data leaves little open to interpretation.  (“Data ends discussions.”)  If you’re not working with good data, but instead using something like a color scheme, then you’ll have to make sure you spend time understanding and interpreting what’s going on.

    I’ll have some more specific recommendations for designing dashboards during my upcoming Monthly Strategy Hour – register to hear more and ask any questions you have.

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  • 10% – The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

    passive-vs-active-investing-2

    Many of you reading this post are 10%ers.  And there’s something in the back of your mind eating away at your conscience.  You know there’s something not quite right about it, but you tell yourself that 10% has always served you well.

    And you might be right.  You’ve probably gotten along well enough with your 10%.  Then again, you may feel like it no longer has the same effect that it used to.  So let’s take a look at your 10% and see if it’s still serving you.

    I’m inspired to write about 10% because I met with a guy last week who said, “It’s just what I’ve always done.  I don’t really have a reason for it, and sometimes I wonder if it’s what I should be doing.  But I’ve never known how else to do it.”

    Later on, after our discussion, he said, “Yes, that’s what I want – that would help me, and it would help my team.  They’ve always been a bit confused and defensive about the 10%.”

    What am I talking about?  Let me use his words, “We did a strategic plan back in 2008, but we’ve never updated it.  It was helpful and we did some things because of it.  But for the last 5 years, I’ve just said that we should grow by 10% next year.  And that’s what I say at the start of each year.  I kind of know that I could or should have more to my goal, but we’ve been OK just trying for that 10%.”

    It’s something I’ve heard many times before.  So, let’s look at the good, the bad, and the ugly of the “Let’s grow 10% next year” approach to strategic planning.

    The good is that it’s an easy way to communicate that you want to grow, but not too much.  It says, “Let’s get better at what we’re doing.”  It’s also quick – most leaders who use 10% as a goal (I just can’t bring myself to call it a strategy!) need about 1 second to access their intuition and come up with that number.  And it’s also good that most leaders who use 10% don’t enforce it – some years they’ll decline 1%, and others they’ll grow 20%, and both are received equally.

    The bad is that 10% doesn’t tell anyone how to achieve 10% growth, and, since the person who used it likes a planning process that only takes 1 second, they usually won’t commit the time to strategy and planning to figure out how to get the 10%.  And so, they just react to whatever the marketplace offers.  That’s not good, but often times 10%ers are bailed out by a strong market, and so reacting is bad but OK.

    Which brings us to the ugly, which arrives when a 10%er is managing a business in a market that is seeing substantial change.  If that’s the situation, 10% is of no use, and in fact may be counter-productive.  Because at the heart of 10% is “let’s change, but not more than we’re comfortable with.”  And that can breed complacency that appears to be fine…until it’s too late for any small adjustments to work.  And if the only goal you’ve ever had is 10% growth, you and your team are not going to be prepared when you need to lead your company outside your comfort zone.

    So, if you’re a 10%er, you have a choice – to be passive or active.  Either keep enjoying that comfortable feeling until you’re forced to do more…or lead your team to have a new set of discussions that develop your company’s ability to identify opportunities a little outside your comfort zone, go after them in smart ways, and stay ahead of the market.

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  • Can you handle Exponential Growth?

    13 October 2014
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    Loch McCabe of Shepherd Advisors uses an interesting frame for thinking about your company’s health and growth.  What would it take to double your revenues – and then double them again?  Loch recently spent an hour with me describing his process for creating Exponential Growth, as he calls it.

    Those kind of results aren’t easy to achieve, but there’s definitely a formula that works, and Loch is good at describing that formula.  (And he’ll be sharing it during his upcoming workshops 10/22 in Ann Arbor and 10/24 in Saginaw.)

    What stands out for me in Loch’s process is the focus on customers and markets.  At the heart of Exponential Growth is customer-based strategy – using insights about your customers to identify the “leverage points” that will give you outsized returns for the investments you make.

    From there, he goes beyond your current customers to look at emerging market trends.  An important part of exponential success is being able to ride the right market waves, and Loch’s process highlights which ones to jump on.

    Loch has asked me to talk about the organizational-development aspects of Exponential Growth during the workshops.  So, when you get the strategy part right, what does it take from a leadership, teamwork, organization, and culture perspective to manage and execute that growth.

    Let me give you a sneak peek of my thoughts here…

    Organic Growth is more accommodating of cracks and stresses in your organization.  Don’t have the right VP of Ops?  Haven’t solidified your sales process?  Don’t have a solid pipeline of talent?  With Organic Growth, those issues are OK – they’ll need to be addressed, and will be over time, but they won’t create any serious risk.

    Exponential Growth, on the other hand, forces and enables you to get your house in order.  It magnifies the strengths and weaknesses of the organization.  It offers a carrot and a stick for dealing with your issues – solve them and you see big results; avoid them and you’ll feel the pain.

    Honestly, Exponential Growth is not for most people.  It requires strong leadership, solid teamwork, effective operations, and a dynamic culture.  Of course, that’s what most companies are aiming for – and struggling with.  And that, I think, is the opportunity that an Exponential Growth vision offers.  It’s like saying we’ll put a man on the moon – it’s a rallying vision to get people to break out of the patterns they have and address the issues that can linger and smolder for years and years if the goal is just Organic Growth.

    What could a game plan for Exponential Growth do for your company?  If you find it intriguing to think about, you should talk with Loch or attend one of the workshops to find out more – see the links above, or let me know you’re interested and I’ll connect you.

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  • Giving Your SWOT More Swagger

    18 September 2014
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    I like SWOT assessments (you know – strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) for getting people’s thinking out of the day-to-day and into a creative, strategic “space.”  Unfortunately, I often see SWOT assessments that are just marginally useful.

    Here are some tips on how to get more value out of your SWOTs.

    If you can take a bullet and put it on someone else’s SWOT without changing it, then you’re not specific enough.  One of the favorites to put under Strengths is “Our People”…which is also a good example of a bullet that is not specific enough to be useful in the planning process.  What is it about your people?  Their experience?  Their deep knowledge?  Their ability to be generalists?  Once I know what’s special about your people, then I can create some possibilities about how to leverage that into a better advantage.

    Work hard to look at the future.  We live our lives in the day-to-day, so it’s hard to look ahead several years.  And that’s why it’s an advantage to do – because most people don’t.

    Put “the hard stuff” on the list.  Every business has issues that it doesn’t like to talk about.  The problem customer.  The problem owner.  The problem staffer.  Without knowing the details, I can tell you that those issues consume a large amount of resources.  So they need to be on your SWOT – though it will probably take some diplomatic phrasing.  (For example:  “Some customers are easier to work with than others,” “Owners are not always aligned on decisions,” and “Spotty follow-through.”)

    Make sure you have bullets that cover the whole breadth of the areas you’re involved in.  Often, leadership teams focus more on certain areas, and that bias comes through on the SWOT.  But the non-focus areas are often the places where there is the most opportunity, especially for companies that are developing from the lean-and-mean start-up to a more complete and sustainable enterprise.

    So, here’s the question to ask about your SWOT to see if you’re getting the value out of it:  “Does it give us insight into where we should commit significant resources over the next 3 years to improve our chances of success?”  If it gives you that, then you’re getting the value you should.  If it doesn’t, then you should take steps to upgrade it – which I’ll cover in my next post.

     

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