• It’s light if you use a forklift

    12 January 2018
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    I was in a meeting this week with a client, and they were talking about the gigantic case they take to trade shows – which is called “The Coffin” and may have cost an employee a finger (the story wasn’t clear and I didn’t want to ask).  The person who bought it, and still saw it’s utility, countered the jokes and jabs by saying, “Well, actually, it’s light if you have a forklift.”  I’m not sure if it was a joke or a legitimate argument, but it got me thinking…

    There are a number of pitfalls that will trip up people who don’t have a lot of experience with strategic planning.  One of the more regular ones – especially in retreats where people are asked to free their thinking – is not taking into account limited resources.

    All kinds of amazing things are possible to dream up if you assume you have unlimited time, effort, strength, brainpower, flexibility, etc.

    That case is light (if a forklift is available where we’re going, and we have the money to pay for it)

    That metal is flexible (if we have a sledgehammer and the strength to wield it)

    That market is accessible (if we have the VP of Sales who knows the right people and can use their trust to benefit our product)

    That new initiative is going to be easy for people to support (if we have a culture that is very adaptive and a leader who consistently pushes it)

    Options that look good with unlimited resources often look terrible when limitations come into play.  So it’s important to take resources – money, bandwidth, expertise, relationships – into account when choosing a strategy.

    Overlooking resource constraints is just one form of a broader category that undermines strategy – the hidden assumption.

    There’s no way to avoid hidden assumptions – we all have them lurking in our blindspots.  But there are things you can do in your planning to reduce the likelihood that assumptions will lead you into a bad decision:

    • Include people with different perspectives in your discussions – and listen to them all
    • Ask, “Why is this a stupid idea?” or “Why would this fail?”
    • Think of other decisions that ended badly and were driven by hidden assumptions, and assess if there are similarities
    • Clarify the criteria that you use to evaluate your options

    One of the things that separates good strategists from poor ones is the ability to see what’s missing and hidden.  It’s a hard skill to develop – it takes knowledge and experience and inquisitiveness and discipline.

    But it’s a really valuable skill.  If you reflect on the worst decisions you’ve made, they are usually built on top of a hidden assumption that turned out to be way more off base, and way more important, than you’d have imagined…if you’d known to think about it.

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  • 50 Shades of Grey, Small Business Edition

    How could I not take up the challenge of finding the link between the 50 Shades juggernaut and my beloved Stage 2 small business clients!?!

    Putting aside the more mundane topics of what Christian Grey’s DISC profile is, the importance of proper inventory processes, and the merits of NDAs, I’m struck by the similarity between Christian’s dominant role and how Shane Yount, owner of the Process-Based Leadership system, describes some companies:

    [Managing by position, proximity, or persuasion] creates dependency. Employees become dependent on their leaders to make the decisions, to solve the problems, to show them what to do and when to do it. Certainly managing by position, proximity and persuasion gets short-term results. But dependency is dysfunctional.

    It may seem extreme to draw a parallel between 50 Shades’ dominant/submissive relationship and how many small business leaders operate, but there’s probably more truth to it than many owners would like to admit.

    Recently I talked with a group of Stage 2 company CEOs, and one of their big a-ha moments was when they realized how dependent their organizations are on the leader’s opinion, intuition, and judgment.

    If you realize that your leadership is out of balance, or if your employees start to refer to you as Mr/Ms Grey…what can you do?

    The first step is creating a dialogue with your managers.  You want a process to be guiding the company, not a person, and to do that, you need to start a process that involves your leaders in key decisions – and then you need to stay committed to it.  And, if you’ve been doing a lot of the talking, start listening more.  Don’t totally hand over the reins, but start to share them.

    What should you talk about?  To start, I like to focus on today – what is working, what isn’t working?  Once you have things working OK, then you can start looking out farther on the horizon – to the next few months, and then to the next year, and then to the next 2-3 years.

    Let’s be honest about something Christian Grey knows – it’s fun and exciting to be in charge, to be The One Who Makes the Calls.  But it’s also not sustainable, and if you’re looking for your business to prosper for the long-run, you need to mature as a leader and expand how you relate to your business.

     

     

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