• How Job Descriptions Need to Change for Growing Small Businesses

    14 May 2012
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    Congratulations, Second Stage CEO.  You’ve gotten customers, survived cash flow crises, created a vibrant team.  And, now, at last, created job descriptions!  You put it off as long as you could, because job descriptions are so un-startup.  But you’ve realized that it’s time to get clear on what people are responsible for, so that there’s more accountability, and so that it’s clear whether that new hire is getting the job done (or not).

    If you’re a young Stage 2 company – say, 10-30 people – your job descriptions can focus on people’s responsibilities – what they do…their functional tasks.

    But if you’ve passed 30 people, you’re going to need more from your job descriptions – rather than responsibilities, you’re going to need to focus on competencies.

    What are competencies?  They are the things that people are able to do – which could mean making copies or putting a design into AutoCAD, or could also mean handling angry customers or juggling multiple priorities.  Sometimes competencies are the functional tasks, but frequently competencies are behaviors that go beyond the task.  Competencies give a much deeper view into what a person, position, or team is capable of.

    Responsibility:  process assessments

    Competency:  recognize errors and problem-solve when one is found

    Responsibility:  respond to customer inquiries

    Competency:  empathize with customers in pressure-filled situations

    You need to know the functional responsibilities of your people.  And if you look at the competencies you need in a position, you’ll paint a much richer picture of who can be successful, and what training your people might need.

    I’ll be talking more about this on my Stage 2 Secrets call this month – click here to register.

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  • When a Small Business Outgrows its Team – Talent Management Lessons

    7 May 2012
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    I work with a relatively small Stage 2 company that recently changed over 40% of its staff – and is far better because they did.

    When I started with them, they had several employees who had been great during the start-up.  They handled the relatively focused and simple work that needed to get done, and they were flexible.

    But then the company started to leave the start-up stage – client work came more regularly, there was less experimentation…and there was more work!  The work got harder and more complicated, and it needed to be done on schedule.

    After almost a year of struggling as a company, the leaders realized that many of their struggles were tied to not getting the productivity out of the team that they needed.  The employees were still good people and good workers – but the company had different needs, and these people were no longer a fit.  And, because these employees weren’t in jobs that fit for them, they were starting to create a negative culture.

    This wasn’t an easy decision.  Some of the workers were friends.  Some had helped build the company.  And, truthfully, the decision took probably twice as long as it needed to because of the loyalty the leaders felt to these staff.

    But when it became clear that the business needed new team members, the leaders made the decision, and gave the old staff generous severances.

    Then they found the right people for the environment, taking their time and thinking about what they needed.
    The results are dramatic.  The team is happy.  The finances are strong.  The work is interesting and fun.  It really is a different company – because it’s a different team.

    In Stage 2, the team is what is most important, not the quality of the work.  I know it’s not easy to make personnel decisions, but there are huge dividends for Second Stage companies that take an active approach to Talent Management.

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